Scenes from Fat: the Play, a play some friends and I cowrote and performed about being fat queer femmes. We entered into Frontera Festival, a short play festival, in Austin and performed initially on Friday. We were then chosen for Best of the Week, and after Saturday’s performance have been selected to go on to Best of the Festival. We will perform two more times this week.

This play was written by BunnyDanJulesAltheaNicoleSandy, and myself and directed by Jules.

The director’s note goes as follows:

We are a group of fat femme-identified queers. Most of us are not actors and don’t identify as writers, but we have stories to tell. For two months, we have been meeting to talk and eat and cry and laugh and write about living in fat bodies. How do our different race, gender and class identities affect our experiences as fat people? How do we undo the internalized shame our culture has taught us? For so long this word has been used against us- to dehumanize us and to pathologize us:

Fat adjective: (of a person or animal) having a large amount of excess flesh.

But fat is not lazy. Fat is not ugly. Fat is not stupid. Fat is fun. Fat is beautiful. Fat is smart. Fat is sexy. 

Take a moment to consider how you think about fat people; about the fat people you see on t.v., the fat people you see in the super market, the fat people that you love. 

This is for you. But it is also for us. We ask you to bear witness to our reclamation.”

Photo credit to Beverly Bland Boydston.

"While in gay and lesbian politics the gender of one’s object of desire is highly politicized, the race of one’s object of desire is immediately and crudely depoliticized as socially insignificant—for whiteness."

Greg Thomas, from “Neo-Colonial Canons of Gender and Sexuality, after COINTELPRO” in The Sexual Demon of Colonial Power

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sosreelthoughts:

Movie Quote of the Week: Paris is Burning (1990)

"When someone has rejection from their mother and father, their family, they - when they get out in the world - they search. They search for someone to fill that void."

(Source: sosreelthoughts.blogspot.com, via strugglingtobeheard)

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(via fag-dreams)

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Memorializing The Victims Of Horrific Firebombing At New Orleans’ Upstairs Lounge: “You Know This Was A Gay Bar”

(Source: projectqueer, via whoisdangerwoman)

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kararikue:

fyqueerlatinxs:

markindelicatofans:

Whitebird on set. - 17/12/12

FIERCE!

*swoon*

kararikue:

fyqueerlatinxs:

markindelicatofans:

Whitebird on set. - 17/12/12

FIERCE!

*swoon*

(Source: )

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(Source: asiabear, via fuckyeahchubbyguysofcolor)

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"I feel it is essential to resist all attempts that discourage the expression of one’s identity. In my case, my identity has been constructed from my own sense of otherness, whether cultural, racial or sexual. These three aspects are not separate within me. Photography is the tool through which I feel most confident in expressing myself. It is photography, therefore—Black, African, homosexual photography—that I must use not just as an instrument, but as a weapon if I am to resist attacks on my integrity and indeed, my existence on my own terms." - Rotimi Fani-Kayode, Traces of Ecstasy

"I feel it is essential to resist all attempts that discourage the expression of one’s identity. In my case, my identity has been constructed from my own sense of otherness, whether cultural, racial or sexual. These three aspects are not separate within me. Photography is the tool through which I feel most confident in expressing myself. It is photography, therefore—Black, African, homosexual photography—that I must use not just as an instrument, but as a weapon if I am to resist attacks on my integrity and indeed, my existence on my own terms." - Rotimi Fani-Kayode, Traces of Ecstasy

(Source: naijaboi)

(Source: travelandskin, via merbakla)

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seoulmate89:

Openly gay bodybuilder Phil Shen (沈菲爾) and his boyfriend TianMaiQuan

(via mzmew)

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"And in the last fifteen years queer theory has harnessed the repetitive, unpredictable energy of currents, waves, and foam to smash and wash into bits many I’s — from the gendered self to the sexed body, from heterocentric feminist speech to homonormative gay discourse. In this field where groundlessness is celebrated, writers also explicitly or implicitly rely on metaphors of fluidity, which provide an undercurrent for expanding formulations of gender and sexual mobility. Judith Butler’s praise of the resistant power of drag’s fluid genders and sexualities in the pivotal Gender Trouble is echoed by many a queer theoretical text: “Perpetual displacement constitutes a fluidity of identities that suggests an openness to resignification and recontextualization; parodic proliferation deprives hegemonic culture and its critics of the right to claim naturalized or essentialist gender identities.” 29 This proliferation multiplies the genders and sexualities explored by queer theory beyond women and men, gay and straight. They soon include, as Eve Sedgwick puts it, “pushy femmes, radical faeries, fantasists, drags, clones, leather folk, ladies in tuxedoes, feminist women or feminist men, masturbators, bulldaggers, divas, Snap! queens, butch bottoms, storytellers, transsexuals, aunties, wannabes.” 30 No deviant is a desert isle here, but part of an archipelago rushed together by a common sea of queerness.
Does this queer sea have a color, though? As the cascading, un-color-coded sentences of Butler and Sedgwick suggest, in the early 1990s prominent queer theorists denaturalized conventional gender and sexuality while renaturalizing global northernness and unmarked whiteness, initially unreferenced as if they were as neutral as fresh water. In both theorists’ early genderscapes, the bodies and selves rendered fluid are first and foremost gendered and sexualized, only faintly marked by other locations — only secondarily racialized, nationalized, classed. When Butler acknowledges that codes of (presumably white) racial purity undergird the gender norms disturbed in her initial consideration of “fluidity of identities,” she does so belatedly and between parentheses (as part of a long list of clarifications to her discussion of drag in the 1999 preface to Gender Trouble). 31 Sedgwick’s list, somewhat differently, momentarily parts the waves of queer theory’s uncommented whiteness as race fades in subtly with the African American – associated terms bulldagger and Snap! queen. Not only is this faint racialization limited to the black-white landscape of the contemporary global north, keeping terms like mahu, mati, tomboy, tongzhi unlistable, but the particularities of this possible racialization remain as unspecified as the color of the leather favored by “leather folk” or the jacket cut of the “ladies in tuxedoes.” The list’s sheer heterogeneity sweeps the bulldagger’s racial particularities into the same washing currents as the butch bottom’s sexual particularities.
These queer theorists are innovative, rigorous scholars whose work focuses on a predominantly white global north but who do — often in introductions— acknowledge how racialization intersects the construction and deconstruction of ossified genders and sexualities. Shortly after her list in Tendencies’ introduction, Sedgwick contends that “a lot of the most exciting recent work around ‘queer’ spins the term outward along dimensions that can’t be subsumed under gender and sexuality at all: the ways that race, ethnicity, postcolonial nationality criss-cross with these and other identity-constituting, identity-fracturing discourses.” 32 This is not her work in a text that goes on to deftly engage Jane Austen and Sigmund Freud, but she does gesture toward the importance of “other” scholars taking it up. Similarly, in the preface to the tenth anniversary edition of Gender Trouble, Butler remarks that “racial presumptions invariably underwrite the discourse on gender in ways that need to be made explicit” and concedes that if she rewrote the book she would include a discussion of racialized sexuality. In thinking through performativity and race, she suggests that “the question to ask is not whether the theory of performativity is transposable onto race, but what happens to the theory when it tries to come to grips with race.” 33 But of course there is not just one question to ask of the meeting point between Butler’s theory and race, and those I would pose would be different still. Namely, what happens when queer theories start with explicit formulations of racialized sexuality and sexualized race, rather than add them in after theories like performativity have already been elaborated? How does this change in point of departure change the tidal pattern of queer theory? How might it shift the field’s dominant metaphors, decentering performativity’s stages and unearthing other topoi?"

Black Atlantic, Queer Atlanic: Queer Imaginings of the Middle Passage by Omise’eke Natasha Tinsley

The entire piece is great and I encourage anyone who can find it to read it!

quarequeen:

DECOLONIZATION MEANS PRISON ABOLITION: film from Law & Disorder Conference @ PSU

A conversation with Decolonize PDX 

imagining different (quare) abolitionist futurities/making our future HERE and NOW//things were not always this way (this isn’t natural) and (PIC) abolition is possible/necessary/now

historical connection/roots of colonialism and prisons

“we are ON STOLEN LANDS”

violence towards/criminalizing of Women of Color: “people don’t think women of color even necessarily have the right to care of their children”

“you can’t reform that shit, get rid of it. there is no reform”…PREACH!

look to activism and resistance led by incarcerated people

COMING UP: PDX Panel on Prison Resistance, Tues. Nov. 13th, 5-7pm http://resistancebehindbars.org/node/315

http://www.becausewemust.org/decolonize-pdx/

(Source: greycoast.wordpress.com)

otaachimow:

I saw an image of a list that for “gender” contained all of these: Androgynous, gender non-conforming, FTM, MTF, trans, transgender, transsexual, trans man, trans woman, female, genderqueer, male, questioning, two-spirit, and other. And someone commented saying “I wonder what ‘other’ would even cover!”

Because people who’ve bought into the Western ideas of gender can’t even imagine that there are other possibilities. They’ve bought into that Western universalism, the idea that their terms are neutral objective words that can express every possible kind of gender. Never mind that there are people who are bakla, ayahkwew, winkte, hijra, onnabe, aggressives. Before the white Western trans movement really kicked off, Western theorists said they were really just men or women. Now there are people saying these people are “really” trans women, trans men, genderqueer. Yeah, not that much of an improvement in my opinion.

And they don’t get off the hook for including Two-Spirit. Every time I see a list of Western gender identities that ends with two-spirit I get more annoyed. Because they don’t want to support actual Native two-spirit people and the way we understand gender and sexuality. They want a token, they want an exotic connector to a mythological transgender past, they want to appropriate it. And then they give it their own definition, having a male and female spirit. And voila! Everything is nicely categorizable in it’s scientific box. No need to actually care about how people of color actually think about their own genders.

(via obscenepromqueen)

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The Golden Phallus, Rotimi Fani-Kayode (1989)

The Golden Phallus, Rotimi Fani-Kayode (1989)

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